Command Descriptions

Menu Index

Back to Top

Alphabetical Index


Back to Top

File


The File Menu

Load Regular Expression From Clipboard

This command inserts the contents of the clipboard into the regular expression window at the current insertion point. The current contents are not removed.

Load Regular Expression From File

This command inserts the contents of a file into the regular expression window at the current insertion point. The current contents are not removed. A file selection dialog is popped up to allow the user to choose the file.

Save Regexp To File

This command copies the contents of the regular expression window into a file. A file selection dialog is popped up to allow the user to choose the file.

Clear Test Data

This command deletes the contents of the test data window.

Edit Test Data

This command makes it possible to edit the test data window. By default, this window cannot be edited, so as to prevent inadvertent corruption of test data loaded from a file. Loading data from a file or from the clipboard reestablishes the ineditability of the window.

Load Test Data From Clipboard

This command inserts the contents of the clipboard into the test data window at the current insertion point. The existing data is not overwritten.

Load Test Data From File

This command inserts the contents of a file into the test data window at the current insertion point. The existing data is not overwritten. A file selection dialog is popped up to allow the user to choose the file.

Save Test Data To File

This command writes the contents of the test data window to a file. A file selection dialog is popped up to allow the user to choose the file.

Edit Results

This command makes it possible to edit the output window, which is locked by default.

Lock Results

This command makes it impossible to edit the output window.

Save Results

This command writes the results to a file. A file selection dialog will pop up so that you can choose the name of the file.

Display Comparison Window

This command displays the comparison data window if it is hidden and hides it if it is displayed.

Clear Comparison Window

This command deletes the contents of the comparison data window.

Edit Comparison Data

This command makes the comparison data window editable.

Load Comparison Data From Clipboard

This command inserts the contents of the clipboard into the comparison data window at the current insertion point. The existing data is not overwritten.

Load Comparison Data From File

This command inserts the contents of a file into the comparison data window at the current insertion point. The existing data is not overwritten. A file selection dialog is popped up to allow the user to choose the file.

Save Comparison Data To File

This command writes the contents of the comparison data window to a file. A file selection dialog is popped up to allow the user to choose the file.

Compare Output and Comparison Data

This command runs a comparison of the result of executing a regular expression and the comparison data. Such a comparison is performed automatically whenever a regular expression is executed. This command allows the user to rerun the comparison in special cases, such as after editing the comparison data.

Quit

This command shuts down the program gracefully. Before exiting, it closes log files, removes temporary files, and shuts down any child processes.


Back to Index By Menu     Back to Alphabetical Index

Program

This button brings up a menu listing all of the programs from which the user may select the program to be used to execute regular expressions. The programs listed are those supported by Redet. They may or may not be available on your system.


Back to Index By Menu     Back to Alphabetical Index

Execute

This command executes the regular expression using the program whose name follows the hyphen in the button label.


Back to Index By Menu     Back to Alphabetical Index

History

Popup History

This command pops up the history list. When this button is pressed, its label changes to Hide History List, which removes the history list from the display.

Show Program

By default, the history list shows only the event number and regular expression. This command causes the program to be displayed as well. When this button is pressed, its label changes to Do Not Show Program

Save History

This command causes the history list to be written to a file.

Prune History

This command removes the unmarked entries on the history list. Marks are set by clicking on an entry and removed by clicking on it again. Marked entries are identified by a distinct color. If you wish to delete all of the entries, see yClear History List.

Clear History

This command removes all of the entries on the history list. If you wish to keep some entries and remove others, see Prune History List


Back to Index By Menu     Back to Alphabetical Index

Clear

This command clears the regular expression and substitution expression windows.


Back to Index By Menu     Back to Alphabetical Index

Palette

This command pops up or takes down the palette of regular expression and substitution notation components for the current program. Left-clicking on an expression selects it. Right-clicking in the gloss region brings up additional information. Right-clicking in the notation region inserts the selected expression into the regular expression window. Double left-clicking in the notation region deletes the last item copied into the regular expression window. This may be repeated until nothing remains to delete. The palette is constructed by executing a large set of tests when the program is selected. It is therefore certain to reflect the features of the selected program on your machine in your locale. The tests are run the first time in a session you use that particular combination of program and locale.


Back to Index By Menu     Back to Alphabetical Index

Tools

Character Entry

Load Custom Character Chart Definition

This command prompts for the name of a file containing a custom character entry chart definition.

Here is an example:
6|Greek Letters
03B1|alpha
03B2|beta
03B3|gamma
03B4|delta
03B5|epsilon
03B6|zeta
03B7|eta
03B8|theta
03B9|iota
03BA|kappa
03BB|lamda
03BC|mu
03BD|nu
03BE|xi
03BF|omicron
03C0|pi
03C1|rho
03C3|sigma
03C2|final sigma
03C4|tau
03C5|upsilon
03C6|phi
03C7|chi
03C8|psi
03C9|omega
03DD|digamma
03DE|koppa
03E1|sampi

The first line specifies that we want six entries per row and that the title is to be Greek Letters. The remaining lines each specify one entry in the chart.

Once you have created such a file, go to the Character Entry menu and select the command Load Custom Character Chart Definition Popup to create a popup window or Load Custom Character Chart Definition Panel to create a character entry box in the Panel. You will be prompted to select a file. Redet will read this file and create a popup chart like the one shown below:


A Customn Characeter Entry Chart With Greek Letters

A letter's gloss appears when the mouse lingers over it. The arrow in the lower right-hand corner deletes the preceding character, allowing you to erase mistakes without moving your hand back to the keyboard.

Notice that an entry for the new popup has appeared in the Character Entry menu. If you destroy the popup, you can recreate it by clicking on this entry.



You can create as many custom character chart popups as you like but only one Panel box. Note also that sequences of characters are acceptable.

Display Accented Letter Chart

This command pops up a palette of letters with accents and other diacritics. Clicking on a button inserts the associated character into whatever window has the input focus.


Accented Letter Entry Chart

Display IPA Consonants

This command pops up a palette of consonants in the International Phonetic Alphabet. They are laid out approximately as in the IPA chart. Clicking on a button inserts the associated character into whatever window has the input focus. For some sounds a different character is widely used in North America. Such "North American IPA" characters are are inserted by clicking with the right mouse button (Control-Mouse Button for Mac users) instead of the left. The button labels normally display the standard IPA characters; if there is also a North American variant it replaces the standard character on the button when the mouse pointer is over the button.


Consonant Entry Chart

Display IPA Vowel Chart

This command pops up a palette of vowels in the International Phonetic Alphabet. They are laid out approximately as in the IPA chart. Clicking on a button inserts the associated character into whatever window has the input focus. For some sounds a different character is widely used in North America. Such "North American IPA" characters are are inserted by clicking with the right mouse button (Control-Mouse Button for Mac users) instead of the left. The button labels normally display the standard IPA characters; if there is also a North American variant it replaces the standard character on the button when the mouse pointer is over the button.


Vowel Entry Chart

Display IPA Diacritic Chart

This command pops up a palette of diacritics in the International Phonetic Alphabet. Clicking on a button inserts the associated character into whatever window has the input focus. For some sounds a different character is widely used in North America. Such "North American IPA" characters are are inserted by clicking with the right mouse button (Control-Mouse Button for Mac users) instead of the left. The button labels normally display the standard IPA characters; if there is also a North American variant it replaces the standard character on the button when the mouse pointer is over the button.

Display Widget for Entering Characters by Unicode Code

This command pops up a window in which the user can enter characters by their hexadecimal Unicode code number. This is not an efficient way to enter text, but it is useful when one needs to enter a character for which another input method is not readily available.


A Widget for Entering Characters by their Unicode Codepoint

Classes

Display Regular Expression Actually Executed

When user-defined character classes are used, the regular expression that is actually executed may be different from what the user enters and sees in the regular expression window. This command determines whether the regular expression actually executed is displayed in a small window of its own.

Display User-Defined Class Palette

This command pops up the palette of user-defined named character classes if it is not displayed and takes it down if it is displayed.

Disable User Classes

This command determines whether Redet will attempt to make use of user-defined named character classes. If user classes are enabled, Redet scans the regular expression as entered by the user and replaces named character classes with the character sets that they represent. If user classes are disabled, no attempt is made to instantiate user-defined named character classes. In this case, references in the regular expression to user-defined named character classes are taken literally. The expansion of built-in named character classes is unaffected.

Enter Character Class Definition

This command allows the user to define a new character class interactively. It pops up a window in which the user can enter the class name, the characters included, and a gloss explaining the nature of the class. To read class definitions from a file, see Enter Character Class Definition.

Load Character Class Definition

This command reads character class definitions from a file. A file selection dialog is popped up to allow the user to choose the file. To define a new class interactively, see Enter Character Class Definition.

Save Character Class Definitions to File

This command copies the list of character class definitions to a file. A file selection dialog is popped up to allow the user to choose the file.

Search

Search Test Data

This command pops up a window which can be used to search the test data.

Search Results

This command pops up a window which the user can use to search the results.

Go to Character in Test Data

This command pops up a window which can be used to move to a specified character in the test data. The character may be specified either by an offset in bytes from the beginning of the data or by the notation l.c where l is the line number and c is the character within the line.

Go to Character in Results

This command pops up a window which can be used to move to a specified character in the results. The character may be specified either by an offset in bytes from the beginning of the data or by the notation l.c where l is the line number and c is the character within the line.

Result Cache

This command pops up a window that allows the user to manipulate the result cache. Redet stores the last five results. This window displays a summary of the stored results consisting of the name of the program used, the number of results, and the first portion of the regular expression. Each result is associated with a checkbox. Any subset of the five results may be selected. Clicking on the Save button causes Redet to save each of the selected results to a distinct file. Redet will bring up a file selection dialogue for each result.

Clicking on the Compare button results in the pairwise comparison of the selected results. Redet will indicate via a message in the Message window whether the results compared are the same or different.

Save Command Information

This command writes to a file the current regular expression and substitution expression, the command line that would be executed, and the daughter program that would be executed. This is useful for debugging and for users who want to use a language or program directly themselves and would like to see how Redet does it. It prompts for the name of the file in which to save the information.

Abort

This command stops the search or substitution currently executing. This can be useful if the daughter hangs or is taking too long or if you realize that you have made a mistake and do not want to wait for a lengthy search to run to completion.



Back to Index By Menu     Back to Alphabetical Index

Configure

Program Specific Features

This command brings up a menu listing the programs for which program-specific parameters may be set. Each entry on the menu toggles a popup control panel specific to the program.

Agrep

Egrep

Emacs

Fgrep

Gawk

Grep

Perl

Perl can be run with flags that make its behavior dependent on the locale or independent of it.

Python

Python provides two kinds of string literals: raw and cooked. In cooked strings, escape sequences are processed. In raw strings, escape sequences are taken literally. You may choose whether to pass the regular expression and substitution expression to Python as raw or cooked strings. For details of Python strings see the documentation at: http://www.python.org/doc/current/ref/strings.html.

Sed

Tr

Feature Testing

Test Features

This command runs the suite of feature tests used to construct the palette and control some other aspects of Redet's behavior. The feature tests are run automatically the first time a particular combination of program and locale is chosen in a session. This command is useful in special situations, such as when you discover that the first version of a program in your path is an outdated version and change it, or when you want to see the debugging output.

Write Features to File

This command generates a list of all of the features for which Redet tests and their values for the current program and locale. A file selection dialog is popped up to allow the user to choose the name of the file. The default file name incorporates the name of the program and the locale. This list may be useful as a summary of the capabilities of each program. At present the features are listed using their internal abbreviations, which may be opaque. A more informative presentation can be expected in the future.

Enable Feature Test Debugging

This command causes detailed diagnostic information to be written to a file when feature tests are run. The information written includes the name of each test, whether it passed or failed, and if it failed, the basis for failure, the intended output, and the actual output. The amount of time used running the tests is also reported. This gives an approximate comparison of the relative speed of the various programs at matching regular expressions. If feature test debugging is enabled, this command can be used to disable it.

Change Mode

This command determines whether regular expressions are merely matched against the test data or whether substitutions are performed on matching strings. By default, it also changes the layout appropriately.

Substitution Output

This command determines what kind of output is generated in substitution mode. In one case, the entire input is copied to the output, with changes made in those lines that match the regular expression. In the other case, only those lines that are changed are output.

Mode/Layout Linkage

By default, Redet uses a standard pair of layouts, with windows stacked vertically in match mode and side-by-side in substitution mode. The layout is changed to conform on changes between match mode and substitution mode.

This command toggles the linkage between mode and layout. If the mode/layout linkage is disabled, Redet will not change the layout on switching between match mode and substitution mode.

Side-by-Side Layout

This command determines which of the two layouts is used. In side-by-side mode, the test data and results are placed side-by-side, with the comparison data to their right, if present. In vertical mode, each window is placed below the previous window.

Expression Layout

This command determines whether the regular expression window and the substitution expression window are positioned side-by-side or one above the other.

Remove Scrollbars

This command removes scrollbars from windows that have them. This can reduce clutter on the display without reducing functionality if only small amounts of data are present or if the user can scroll by other means, such as by using a wheel mouse. This is a toggle. If scrollbars are not present, it restores them.

Select Colors

This command allows the user to choose the colors used in the various Redet windows. Both foreground and background colors may be set. A color selection dialog is popped up.

Select Font

This command allows the user to choose the font family, size, and weight A font selection tool is popped up.

Select Locale

This command allows the user to change the locale. The change affects only Redet itself and the programs that it runs as daughters. The shell from which Redet was run is not affected. Changing locales may affect aspects of regular expression matching, such as the meaning of character ranges. If a suitable translation is available, it will also change the language of Redet's interface. A dialog listing the available locales is popped up.

Make Focus Follow Mouse

This command makes the input focus follow the mouse pointer. It is intended to be a toggle, but at present, due to a limitation in Tk, the windowing toolkit that Redet uses, it is impossible to switch back to explicit focus. (If you really want to change back, you can do it by exiting Redet and restarting.)

Order Unicode Ranges by Codepoint

The list of Unicode ranges accessible from the Help menu can be ordered either alphabetically by range (the default) or by codepoint. This command allows you to switch from one ordering to the other.

Show Balloon Help

This command causes a brief explanation of the use of a window to pop up if the mouse lingers over that region for a while.


Back to Index By Menu     Back to Alphabetical Index

Help

About

This command provides basic information about this program.

Bug Reports

This command provides instructions for submitting bug reports. Please read it if you intend to submit a bug report.

Command Descriptions

This command invokes a browser to show the comman description section of the reference manual.

Description

This command pops up a general description of the program.

Illustrated Web Manual

This command brings up this reference manual in a browser. If the browser is already running, it may simply point it at the manual. In this case, if the browser is running on another desktop, you may have to switch to that desktop and read the manual there, or move the browser window to the desktop on which you are running Redet.

Key Bindings

Some commands can be executed by typing on the keyboard as well as through the menu system. The pairing of a sequence of key presses with a command is known as a key binding. This command provides a description of the key bindings currently in force.

License

This command provides a copy of the GNU General Public License, the license under which this program is distributed.

Programs

This command presents links to information about the various programs to which Redet provides an interface.

This Program

This command pops up a placard containing information about the current program that does not appear in the feature palette, such as whether it supports matching, substitution, or both, and to what extent it supports Unicode..

Unicode General Character Properties

Unicode characters are classiied according to a number of properties, such as whether they are letters, numbers, punctuation, math symbols and so forth. Some languages, such as Java and Perl, provide character classes corresponding to the equivalence classes defined by these character properties. This command provides a list of the character properties and the abbreviations used to identify them.

Unicode Ranges

The Unicode encoding is divided into ranges. These correspond roughly to the sets of characters used in a particular writing system. For example, the Armenian range includes all of the letters and punctuation symbols used to write Armenian.

Other ranges, however, include characters belonging to a number of related writing systems. For example, the Cyrillic range includes the characters used to write such Slavic languages as Russian and Serbian as well as characters used to write other languages of the former Soviet Union, such as Kazakh. The Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics range contains characters used to write languages including Cree, Ojibwe, Slave, Inuktitut, and Carrier.

Some languages require charcters drawn from more than one range. For example, languages such as French, which use variants of the Roman alphabet, use characters both from the Basic Latin range, which contains the Roman alphabet as used in English, and one or more of the ranges C1 Controls and Latin-1 Supplement, Latin Extended-A, and Latin Extended-B. Other ranges include various kinds of symbols. Some languages, such as Java and Perl, provide character classes corresponding to these Unicode ranges. his command defaults to listing the ranges in alphabetical order. They may also be listed in numerical order of the codepoints. See Unicode Range Order.


Back to Index By Menu     Back to Alphabetical Index

Next

Back to Manual Table of Contents